Waiting for Superman

This morning while browsing the New York Times online, I stumbled upon a trailer for a new documentary called, “Waiting for Superman” by Davis Guggenheim director of  “An Inconvenient Truth“.

The new film follows 5 families who live in cities as they “seek alternatives to abysmal local schools” .

Full disclosure: I haven’t seen the film yet; just watched the trailer this morning. And, of course, the film is not about Early Childhood Education. However, I wanted to share this with you because I have been thinking a lot lately about where children go after preschool. We have so many challenges in Early Childhood, but it doesn’t seem to compare to the challenges faced in the world of K-12.I guess, in many ways, I have isolated myself from that world as there is so much to learn about my own field! However, for the past year or so, I’ve been reading more about Education from a kind of lifespan perspective; preK through higher ed. My thinking and reading culminated in August of this year when I attended one of those game-changing conferences: The Future of Learning Institute at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

This was a professional development opportunity for me and I jumped at the chance to go to Harvard and check it out. I was fortunate to learn from some of the greats such Howard Gardner and David Perkins. I also had the chance to learn from someone new to me, Ron Richhart from Project Zero. I will talk more about this conference in coming weeks. There is so much to consider and I’d like to spend some time reflecting on that with you. A big message from the conference was that education across the board needs to change – nothing new there. However, I did find their organizing themes to be helpful. The lenses through which we need to view education are 1) globalization, 2) the digital revolution, and 3) mind, brain. More to come about these themes and what I learned at the conference so, stay tuned!

I tend to ruminate, it’s my way. I think about things. They rattle around for awhile. I test things out, experiment, and then ruminate some more. Watching the trailer this morning for “Waiting for Superman” hit me on a gut level. I feel more compelled to dive into the fray and begin a stronger life of advocacy for children – all children, not just those from birth to age 8! We can’t really wait for Superman, can we?

Let me know what you think of the trailer and once folks have seen the movie, perhaps we can review it together and consider how the world of k-12 influences our thinking about early childhood.

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